New Routines and Check-in



I've officially been working from home for over 10 weeks. The first few weeks were stressful, I didn't think I could do it while parenting all day and now I've settled in. Honestly, I would be fine working from home indefinitely. I really do enjoy it, and I'm quite surprised. It's still stressful with me having my son at home but it works. We homeschool in the evenings, and we do our best. Somedays homeschool doesn't happen and that's okay too.

Life Update - Check In

Life Update - Check In

It's been a while, life changed pretty quickly and I had to figure out this new normal. Our schools closed March 13th and I've been working from home since. I had brought my laptop home on the 12th to test out my VPN and the 13th I texted my manager to ask if she wanted me to take the time off or work from home. At first, I was VERY overwhelmed and didn't know if I could settle into working from home while having my son with me. I work in telecommunications and as you can imagine, we had an influx of demands. I was pretty stressed out those first few weeks, I will admit. Most businesses were closed shortly after schools closed and my husband was laid off, we had to work through unemployment while so many others were also applying. My husband was called back to work two weeks after as an essential worker. His company is now working with minimal staff. So that's where we are currently regarding work. 

Book Review: The Promise of Stardust by Priscille Sibley (A Pregnant Wife On Life Support. A Families Decision On What To Do.)




Book Review: The Promise of Stardust by Priscille Sibley  (A Pregnant Wife On Life Support. A Families Decision On What To Do.)




Matt and Elle grew up together and fell in love as teenagers. It took them a while to find their way back to each other but they found their way back, married and hoped to start a family. After a series of miscarriages and a stillbirth, Matt told Elle they would no longer try. When he was called into the emergency room because Elle had an accident, he wasn’t expecting to see her on life support and declared brain dead. Elle was adamant that she not be kept alive by machines. She watched her mother suffer from cancer and vowed not to have the same circumstance. Matt knew he had to make a decision, and his decision was made until he found out she was pregnant. If he kept her on life support, the baby had a chance to live. His mother loved Elle like a daughter and couldn’t support Matt on his decision. She threatens to take him to court and fight to take Elle off life support.

Book Review: Bone and Bread by Saleema Nawaz (5 Star Rating)

Book Review: Bone and Bread by Saleema Nawaz (5 Star Rating)

Sisters, Beena and Sadhana grew up in a loving home with parents of different cultural backgrounds. Their mother was born in North America and travelled the world, she was very much a free spirit while their father came from a conservative family in India. Their father owned and operated a bagel shop in Montreal, while their Uncle managed the day to day tasks. When their father suddenly passes away, the three of them are left to grieve and learn to cope. A few short years later, their mother tragically passes away and the teenage girls are suddenly orphaned and left under the guardianship of their strict, single Uncle.  The family never approved of their mother and Beena and Sadhana had no other relatives they knew nearby. Tragedy and grief seemed to always be around the corner for these sisters. Beena unexpectedly becomes pregnant at sixteen and Sadhana develops anorexia.

February Month In Review (Snowfall, Life Lessons, Vet Visit, Wet'suwet'en Strong, Racism in Canada)

February Month In Review (Snowfall, Life Lessons, Vet Visit, Wet'suwet'en Strong, Racism in Canada)

I was thinking about writing my month in review. and I didn't think I had anything to say. I opened my weekly planner that I use for quick daily journaling and I realized that February was filled with a lot more that I remembered.  This is why I started daily journaling, I love jotting down snippets of my thoughts throughout the week.

We started out February with 45 cm of snow and my city really dragged their feet in removing it. It made walking to school pretty difficult, and parking was a mess. I'm at the point where I want winter to finish up. I know we don't have that many weeks left, but I'm just over it.

Review: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (What happens when a pandemic hits North America?)



Review: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (What happens when a pandemic hits North America?)



Station Eleven is a post-apocalyptic book, and the story starts out really strong and believable. Jeevan Chaudhary attends a play featuring, a famous actor named Arthur Leander. During the middle of the play, Arthur has a heart attack and dies. Jeevan leaves the theatre and heads home, and then he receives a phone call from his friend that he needs to get out of town, fast.  A plague has hit North America and within hours, those who are symptomatic are dead. Station Eleven tells the story of Arthur, Jeevan and a group of actors who roam around the ruins of this post-apocalyptic world.

Book Review: As Long as the Rivers Flow by James Bartleman (Indigenous Author)

Book Review: As Long as the Rivers Flow by James Bartleman (Indigenous Author)



At the age of six years old, Martha boarded a floatplane all alone and left for the residential school. Frightened and traumatized by the floatplane, her journey was just beginning, her screams were heard by no one. The moment she arrives at the residential school- sincere affection would no longer be shown to her. Children were to obey. Her language was no longer to be spoken or severe consequences would ensue. Stripped of all her clothes, she was showered by the nuns and sprayed with lice powder. Martha was to assimilate, and she would have no say in the matter. She soon began to understand that she was powerless. When the priest took a liking to Martha, she was summoned by the nuns and forced to visit the priest for her “special lessons.” This continued until Martha became a teenager, and he lost interest.  Martha would attend residential school for ten years. Over the course of her education, Martha had moments of laughter and joy,  and she forgave the nuns when she realized that they were victims too, doing what they were told and taught not to question their chain of command. In her final years of school, Martha appeared calm and resigned. She returned home and would be scolded for not trying to hang on to her language. Years of estrangement would take a toll on mother and daughter and Martha had a lot of resentment for her mother who refused to hear her stories.  Her father had passed on, and he remained a memory. Martha left school with a high school education, and emotional wounds so deep they would never fully heal. When the school closed its doors for good, the trauma had already been done. 

Book Review: Seven Fallen Feathers Racism, Death and Hard Truths In A Northern City (Indigenous Author) Non Fiction

Book Review: Seven Fallen Feathers Racism, Death and Hard Truths In A Northern City (Indigenous Author) Non Fiction




The month that I read this book, I had to take it slow. Seven Fallen Feather by Tanya Talaga., hurt my heart. As an indigenous woman, and a mother this was difficult to read. 

Over the course of 11 years (2000-2011) seven indigenous teenagers were found dead, 5 of those were found in the river. This happened in Thunder Bay, Ontario while these children were attending high school, hundreds of miles away from their families. Living in remote communities, these children were forced to leave their homes if they wanted a chance to finish their high school education. Beyond the eighth grade, these children need to leave home because their communities don't have schools set up to educate them. Why? the funding isn't there. Can you imagine sending your child away from home at such a young age? These young teenagers are vulnerable, in many cases living with strangers, and the system failed them.